"Inspiring All to Achieve"

Funding Information and Fact Sheet

Funding information and factsheet – January 2018

 

Context:

Schools and academies in West Sussex have been severely financially disadvantaged for at least a decade. Over the past three years additional rising costs have seen matters reach a critical point.  On average, large secondary schools have been making savings of approximately £250k year on year.   Primary and special school budgets have been under equal pressure. 

 

What does the National Funding Formula do for low funded schools and counties?

 

“In conclusion, the new national funding formulae will redress historic inequities in funding that have existed for too long” - Justine Greening MP – Secretary of State for Education – New National Funding Formula announcement, September 2017.

 

“This means that for the first time everyone can see what the national funding formula will mean for them and understand why. Alongside addressing these historical injustices…” – Nick Gibb MP – Minister for Schools, October 2017.

 

The new National Funding Formula does not solve the two problems that it was designed to tackle – real terms funding decline and funding inequalities across schools and counties.

 

The new National Funding Formula has injected some additional cash in to schools.  Much of this will be offset by rising costs.  In real terms school budgets will either have a small uplift or will remain static in 2018 and beyond.   Worked examples for individual schools are provided below to demonstrate this point.

 

Schools and pupils are judged by identical performance data including KS2 and GCSE outcomes and also by OFSTED.  Funding for schools with similar socio-economic characteristics will still be hamstrung by significant inequities under new National Funding Formula proposals.  

 

Please find below exemplars of the funding disparities that will persist under the new National Funding Formula in each constituency area:

 

Bognor and Littlehampton –Nick Gibb MP

 

Felpham CC

(1177 students) 

Greenwich

(1177 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1177 students)

Difference

£5,503,056

£7,592,827

-£2,089,771 (38%)

£9,227,680

-£3,724,624 (68%)

 

Littlehampton Academy (1263)

Greenwich

(1263 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1263 students)

Difference

£6,372,441

£8,147,613

-£1,775,172 (28%)

£9,901,920

-£3,529,479 (55%)

 

Crawley – Henry Smith MP

 

St Wilfrid’s

(750 Students)

Greenwich

(750 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(750 students)

Difference

£3,741,353

£4,838,250

-£1,096,897 (29%)

£5,880,000

-£2,138,647 (57%)

 

Ifield CC

(855 students)

Greenwich

(855 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(855 students)

Difference

£4,511,520

£5,515,605

-£1,004,085 (22%)

£6,703,200

-£2,191,680 (49%)

 

Oriel

(1189 Students)

Greenwich

(1189 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1189 students)

Difference

£5,504,332

£7,670,239

-£2,165,907 (39%)

£9,321,760

-£3,817,428 (69%)

 

 

Horsham – Jeremy Quin MP

 

Tanbridge House

(1420 students)

Greenwich

(1420 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1420 students)

Difference

£6,517,800

£9,160,420

-£2,642,620 (41%)

£11,132,800

-£4,615,000 (71%)

 

The Weald

(1322 students)

Greenwich

(1322 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1322 students)

Difference

£6,067,980

£8,528,222

-£2,460,242 (40%)

£10,364,480

-£4,296,500 (71%)

 

 

Mid Sussex – Sir Nicholas Soames MP

 

St Paul’s

(758 students)

Greenwich

(758 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(758 students)

Difference

£3,479,220

£4,889,858

-£1,410,638 (41%)

£5,942,720

-£2,463,500 (70%)

 

Sackville

(1244 students)

Greenwich

(1244 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1244 students)

Difference

£5,618,160

£8,025,044

-£2,406,884 (43%)

£9,752,960

-£4,134,800 (74%)

 

 

Worthing East and Shoreham – Tim Loughton MP

 

Davison

(1176 students)

Greenwich

(1176 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1176 students)

Difference

£5,426,175

£7,586,376

-£2,160,201 (40%)

£9,219,840

-£3,793,665 (70%)

 

Swiss Gardens

(432 students)

Greenwich

(432 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(432 students)

Difference

£1,489,000

£2,115,936

-£626,936 (42%)

£2,543,184

-£1,054,184 (71%)

 

Sir Robert Woodard Academy  (884 students)

Greenwich

(884 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(884 students)

Difference

£4,399,428

£5,702,684

-£1,303,256 (30%)

£6,930,560

-£2,531,132 (58%)

 

Worthing High School

(912 students)

Greenwich

(912 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(912 students)

Difference

£4,280,066

£5,883,312

-£1,603,246 (37%)

£7,150,080

-£2,870,014 (67%)

 

Chichester – Gillian Keegan MP

 

Bishop Luffa

(1136 students)

Greenwich

(1136 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1136 students)

Difference

£5,214,240

£7,328,336

-£2,114,096 (41%)

£8,906,240

-£3,692,000 (71%)

 

Chichester High School

(1233 students)

Greenwich

(1233 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1233 students)

Difference

£5,862,438

£7,954,083

-£2,091,645 (36%)

£9,666,720

-£3,804,282 (65%)

 

 

Arundel and South Downs – Nick Herbert MP

 

Steyning Grammar

(1636 students)

Greenwich

(1636 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1636 students)

Difference

£7,511,152

£10,553,836

-£3,042,684 (41%)

£12,826,240

-£5,315,088 (71%)

 

Angmering

(1236 students)

Greenwich

(1236 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1236 students)

Difference

£5,689,625

£7,973,436

-£2,283,811 (40%)

£9,690,240

-£4,000,615 (70%)

 

Upper Beeding

(340 students)

Greenwich

(340 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(340 students)

Difference

£1,201,000

£1,665,320

-£464,320 (39%)

£2,001,580

-£800,580 (67%)

 

 

Worthing West – Sir Peter Bottomley MP

 

Durrington

(1685 students)

Greenwich

(1685 students)

Difference 

Hackney

(1685 students)

Difference

£7,957,009

£10,869,935

-£2,912,926 (37%)

£13,210,400

-£5,253,391 (66%)

 

Please note these statistics are all based on the Department for Education’s own database for the financial year 2018-19.  The figures relate to year groups 7-11 and do not include additional funding such as Pupil Premium Grant (PPG).  PPG is worth £1320 per eligible pupil in primary schools and £935 per eligible pupil in secondary schools.

 

NB a secondary school with 250 pupils eligible for free school meals in the last 6 years would receive an additional £233,750 through PPG.

 

A large secondary school with 25% of pupils (400) eligible for Pupil Premium would receive an additional £374,000 each year.

 

It should be noted that London schools must pay a higher London weighted salary.  This can account for 10-15% higher costs.  Areas as such as Crawley, must also pay a higher ‘fringe allowance’ for salaries. 

 

How does the new funding formula impact upon schools and academies in West Sussex?

 

Average per pupil unit funding

Primary (PUF)

Secondary (SUF)

Average per pupil funding West Sussex

£3,677

£4,756

Average per pupil funding Greenwich

£4,898

£6,451

Average per pupil funding Hackney

£5,887

£7,840

 

  • Under the new National Funding Formula, West Sussex will receive £12.8 million. West Sussex has 104,000 pupils so our per pupil uplift is £12.8million divided by 104,000 = £123 per pupil
  • In 2018 West Sussex pupils will receive £423 million in total. The average funded authority – Reading – will receive £30 million more.
  • Pupils in Greenwich will receive £145 million more
  • Pupils in Hackney will receive £263 million more
  • Over a five year span – the lifetime of secondary school placement – pupils in Greenwich will receive £725 million more than their counterparts in West Sussex.
  • Over a five year span – the lifetime of secondary school placement – pupils in Hackney will receive £1.31 billion more than their counterparts in West Sussex.
  • All of the funding differences noted above exclude the additional funding that Pupil Premium provides.

 

Please note that the same proportionate funding differentials apply in the primary school sector. 

 

Special schools in West Sussex also receive lower average funding than equivalent schools in other local authorities. Furthermore, unlike mainstream schools there is no planned funding uplift, even 0.5% per pupil, planned in 2018/19 owing to the funding pressures affecting High Needs

 

Manor Green Special School (Crawley) receives £4,120 per pupil less than the national median excluding London.  This equates to -£861,080 (23% less funding) for their roll of 209 severely disabled students.  They lack the average London median income by £12,598 per pupil for 209 pupils, this creates an income difference of -£2,632,982 (71% less funding).  

 

The calculations above show the funding that exemplar secondary schools in West Sussex will receive in 2018/19 and compares it to the funding that the same sized average funded school would receive in Greenwich (£6,451 per pupil) and Hackney (£7,840 per pupil).    Please note that for simplicity the calculations are based on the Secondary Units of Funding (SUF) which apply to Greenwich and Hackney. The SUF is the average unit of funding based on all NFF formula factors and local pupil characteristics for secondary schools in each LA. Premises costs, such as rates and PFI are excluded from all calculations.